Arizona Trusts Laws

What Documents Does an Estate Plan Include | Arizona

Michelle J. Perkins

 

A basic estate plan is going to include a last will and testament, financial power of attorney, medical power of attorney with mental health powers and living will, and a personal property list if the individual chooses to create one. These are documents that every estate plan will have. From there, people have choices. For example, if you have minor children and want money paid to them over time, many couples will elect to create a revocable living trust. A trust will allow for the passing of someone’s estate without going through probate, keeping your financial information private, and allowing for money and assets to be given out over time, rather than one lump some, which is what happens in a probate situation. There are additional estate-planning documents that can be drafted if you want to avoid probate and you do not have a trust. For example, a beneficiary deed will allow you to select who will receive your house and other real estate immediately upon your death without ever having to go through the probate process. And, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows us to prepare a beneficiary designation, so that you can select who will receive your vehicle upon your death. There are many tools that an estate planner can provide to help you with setting things up to care for you and your loved ones. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you would like to review estate planning documents with an attorney, visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

A basic estate plan is going to include a last will and testament, financial power of attorney, medical power of attorney with mental health powers and living will, and a personal property list if the individual chooses to create one. These are documents that every estate plan will have. From there, people have choices. For example, if you have minor children and want money paid to them over time, many couples will elect to create a revocable living trust. A trust will allow for the passing of someone’s estate without going through probate, keeping your financial information private, and allowing for money and assets to be given out over time, rather than one lump some, which is what happens in a probate situation. There are additional estate-planning documents that can be drafted if you want to avoid probate and you do not have a trust. For example, a beneficiary deed will allow you to select who will receive your house and other real estate immediately upon your death without ever having to go through the probate process. And, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows us to prepare a beneficiary designation, so that you can select who will receive your vehicle upon your death. There are many tools that an estate planner can provide to help you with setting things up to care for you and your loved ones. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you would like to review estate planning documents with an attorney, visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

What is a Trust | Scottsdale Estate Planning

Chris Hildebrand

 

Trusts

I want to speak to you today regarding what a trust is in the state of Arizona. A trust is a legal document authorizing a third party, known as a trustee, to manage your income and assets for the benefit of your beneficiaries. It may either be a revocable, meaning the trust may be terminated, or irrevocable, meaning the trust may not be terminated and the income and assets must remain in the trust and manage according to the terms of the trust.

Benefits of a Trust

A properly executed trust may be used by a person to avoid probate of the estate after his or her death and to control the manner in which his or her wealth is distributed or managed for the benefit of the beneficiaries. There are also potential tax benefits and legal protections available from the creditors of your beneficiaries that are inherent in trusts. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law if you have any other questions regarding trusts in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

Trusts

I want to speak to you today regarding what a trust is in the state of Arizona. A trust is a legal document authorizing a third party, known as a trustee, to manage your income and assets for the benefit of your beneficiaries. It may either be a revocable, meaning the trust may be terminated, or irrevocable, meaning the trust may not be terminated and the income and assets must remain in the trust and manage according to the terms of the trust.

Benefits of a Trust

A properly executed trust may be used by a person to avoid probate of the estate after his or her death and to control the manner in which his or her wealth is distributed or managed for the benefit of the beneficiaries. There are also potential tax benefits and legal protections available from the creditors of your beneficiaries that are inherent in trusts. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law if you have any other questions regarding trusts in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

What is an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

An irrevocable life insurance trust is a trust that if properly setup and maintained, will exclude the death benefit from your taxable estate, and maybe used to establish trusts for your loved ones where the assets of your trust are protected from your loved one’s creditors and there own spend thrift habits. There are many features to a life insurance trust that can add flexibility to your ability to control the assets and remain within IRS guidelines. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating a life insurance trust for you that will stand the test of time.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

An irrevocable life insurance trust is a trust that if properly setup and maintained, will exclude the death benefit from your taxable estate, and maybe used to establish trusts for your loved ones where the assets of your trust are protected from your loved one’s creditors and there own spend thrift habits. There are many features to a life insurance trust that can add flexibility to your ability to control the assets and remain within IRS guidelines. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating a life insurance trust for you that will stand the test of time.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

What is a Living Trust | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

A living trust is a popular tool used to avoid a probate proceeding, provide creditor protection to a surviving spouse, keep your financial information private, and allow you to avoid a conservatorship and direct who will handle your finances if you are unable to do so yourself. It allows you to give your wealth to who you want, when you want, and how you want all at the lowest possible cost including taxes, expenses, and professional fees. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

A living trust is a popular tool used to avoid a probate proceeding, provide creditor protection to a surviving spouse, keep your financial information private, and allow you to avoid a conservatorship and direct who will handle your finances if you are unable to do so yourself. It allows you to give your wealth to who you want, when you want, and how you want all at the lowest possible cost including taxes, expenses, and professional fees. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

Irrevocable Trust Laws Explained | Phoenix Estate Planning

Beth Cohn

 

Hi, I’m Beth Cohn. I’m an attorney at Jaburg Wilk and I work in the area of estate planning.

What is an Irrevocable Trust

An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be changed. Many times, people will use an irrevocable trust when they want to make gifts to their children or their grandchildren and they don’t want them to get the benefits from those trusts right away.

Amending Irrevocable Trusts in Arizona

There are a couple of options under Arizona law and one of them is having to go to court. We have a new set of statutes in Arizona, under our Arizona Trust Code, that give us guidelines of when we have to go to court in order to request court approval to make changes to irrevocable trusts. But there’s also some more flexibility that’s been given to trustees to make some changes if the provisions and the trusts allow it.

Provisions That Allow Changes to be Made

There’s a provision that’s called decanting and decanting is available for certain trusts. Usually, there’s something in that trust that someone doesn’t like. And what they do, literally, is they create a new trust and they pour those assets from the old trust into the new trust. So decanting is a technique that allows a trustee to make that decision and to transfer assets from the old broken trust to a new fixed trust. There’s some other requirements that are more technical, but it gives the trustee a lot of power if the trustee has certain discretion in the trust.

Do I Need an Attorney to Make a Trust

Well, I think there’s always a benefit. Unfortunately, I’ve seen some of the worst cases when people have grabbed forms and tried to do estate plans themselves. Whether the estate is smaller or larger, estate planning is very technical and there’s rules that we have to comply with. So I advise anybody who needs to have an estate plan done, to see an attorney.

By: Beth Cohn

Hi, I’m Beth Cohn. I’m an attorney at Jaburg Wilk and I work in the area of estate planning.

What is an Irrevocable Trust

An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be changed. Many times, people will use an irrevocable trust when they want to make gifts to their children or their grandchildren and they don’t want them to get the benefits from those trusts right away.

Amending Irrevocable Trusts in Arizona

There are a couple of options under Arizona law and one of them is having to go to court. We have a new set of statutes in Arizona, under our Arizona Trust Code, that give us guidelines of when we have to go to court in order to request court approval to make changes to irrevocable trusts. But there’s also some more flexibility that’s been given to trustees to make some changes if the provisions and the trusts allow it.

Provisions That Allow Changes to be Made

There’s a provision that’s called decanting and decanting is available for certain trusts. Usually, there’s something in that trust that someone doesn’t like. And what they do, literally, is they create a new trust and they pour those assets from the old trust into the new trust. So decanting is a technique that allows a trustee to make that decision and to transfer assets from the old broken trust to a new fixed trust. There’s some other requirements that are more technical, but it gives the trustee a lot of power if the trustee has certain discretion in the trust.

Do I Need an Attorney to Make a Trust

Well, I think there’s always a benefit. Unfortunately, I’ve seen some of the worst cases when people have grabbed forms and tried to do estate plans themselves. Whether the estate is smaller or larger, estate planning is very technical and there’s rules that we have to comply with. So I advise anybody who needs to have an estate plan done, to see an attorney.

By: Beth Cohn

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