Arizona Probate Litigation Laws

How to Avoid Probate | Scottsdale Estate Planning

Chris Hildebrand

 

How to Avoid Probate in Scottsdale

I want to speak to you today regarding how you may avoid probate in the state of Arizona. Since probate is a legal proceeding, lawyers may be retained to represent heirs of the person appointed to manage the person’s estate. Avoiding probate therefore, will likely save the estate and parties the attorneys fees and other costs incurred in a probate case.

Estate Planning

A properly executed estate plan, including a properly executed trust, funded with all of your property and appointing an executor to manage your estate will in most cases avoid the need for your heirs to be involved in a probate action in Arizona. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law, if you have any other questions on ways to avoid a probate in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

How to Avoid Probate in Scottsdale

I want to speak to you today regarding how you may avoid probate in the state of Arizona. Since probate is a legal proceeding, lawyers may be retained to represent heirs of the person appointed to manage the person’s estate. Avoiding probate therefore, will likely save the estate and parties the attorneys fees and other costs incurred in a probate case.

Estate Planning

A properly executed estate plan, including a properly executed trust, funded with all of your property and appointing an executor to manage your estate will in most cases avoid the need for your heirs to be involved in a probate action in Arizona. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law, if you have any other questions on ways to avoid a probate in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

What Documents Does an Estate Plan Include | Arizona

Michelle J. Perkins

 

A basic estate plan is going to include a last will and testament, financial power of attorney, medical power of attorney with mental health powers and living will, and a personal property list if the individual chooses to create one. These are documents that every estate plan will have. From there, people have choices. For example, if you have minor children and want money paid to them over time, many couples will elect to create a revocable living trust. A trust will allow for the passing of someone’s estate without going through probate, keeping your financial information private, and allowing for money and assets to be given out over time, rather than one lump some, which is what happens in a probate situation. There are additional estate-planning documents that can be drafted if you want to avoid probate and you do not have a trust. For example, a beneficiary deed will allow you to select who will receive your house and other real estate immediately upon your death without ever having to go through the probate process. And, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows us to prepare a beneficiary designation, so that you can select who will receive your vehicle upon your death. There are many tools that an estate planner can provide to help you with setting things up to care for you and your loved ones. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you would like to review estate planning documents with an attorney, visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

A basic estate plan is going to include a last will and testament, financial power of attorney, medical power of attorney with mental health powers and living will, and a personal property list if the individual chooses to create one. These are documents that every estate plan will have. From there, people have choices. For example, if you have minor children and want money paid to them over time, many couples will elect to create a revocable living trust. A trust will allow for the passing of someone’s estate without going through probate, keeping your financial information private, and allowing for money and assets to be given out over time, rather than one lump some, which is what happens in a probate situation. There are additional estate-planning documents that can be drafted if you want to avoid probate and you do not have a trust. For example, a beneficiary deed will allow you to select who will receive your house and other real estate immediately upon your death without ever having to go through the probate process. And, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows us to prepare a beneficiary designation, so that you can select who will receive your vehicle upon your death. There are many tools that an estate planner can provide to help you with setting things up to care for you and your loved ones. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you would like to review estate planning documents with an attorney, visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

What is Probate and How Can it be Avoided | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

Probate is the legal process that confirms who is entitled to your property when you die and provides someone with the authority to transfer real estate, bank accounts, investments, and any other property you own that requires proof of ownership before it can be transferred. You can avoid probate if all of your important assets pass by operation of law. Property can pass by operation of law in one of the following six ways: beneficiary designations for retirement accounts, life insurance, and annuities, two, joint bank accounts, three, rights of survivorship and real property, four, other contractual rights, five, POD or TOD designations on bank or investment accounts, and six, beneficiary deeds for real property. You can also avoid probate, but not administration of your assets if you have a living trust. Whether avoiding probate or administration is a good idea depends on your particular circumstances. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out how I can use my knowledge and experience to help you choose the best estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

Probate is the legal process that confirms who is entitled to your property when you die and provides someone with the authority to transfer real estate, bank accounts, investments, and any other property you own that requires proof of ownership before it can be transferred. You can avoid probate if all of your important assets pass by operation of law. Property can pass by operation of law in one of the following six ways: beneficiary designations for retirement accounts, life insurance, and annuities, two, joint bank accounts, three, rights of survivorship and real property, four, other contractual rights, five, POD or TOD designations on bank or investment accounts, and six, beneficiary deeds for real property. You can also avoid probate, but not administration of your assets if you have a living trust. Whether avoiding probate or administration is a good idea depends on your particular circumstances. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out how I can use my knowledge and experience to help you choose the best estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

How To Avoid Probate | Scottsdale Estate Planning

Michelle J. Perkins

 

If you are interested in avoiding probate and having your estate administered privately, meeting not in the public record, there are several ways to accomplish that. First, we can setup a trust. A trust will hold your assets during your lifetime, you will manage everything virtually the same way you did before, and upon your disability or death, the trust spells out who is going to take over and who gets what and when. A trust is a great instrument for payment of money over time. So, if you have minor children, a trust could be the solution for you. Another way to avoid probate is to make sure you have beneficiary designations on all of your assets. For example, on your house or real estate, you can sign a beneficiary deed that states who gets your house or real property upon your passing, and all the person has to do to receive that property is to record a death certificate with the Maricopa County recorder’s office. With your vehicles, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows you to sign a beneficiary designation form that will allow for easy transfer of title upon your death. And, with financial accounts and life insurance, you can nominate the person or persons who will receive those assets all without ever having to go through probate. If you would like to setup an estate plan to avoid the probate process, please give us a call at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

If you are interested in avoiding probate and having your estate administered privately, meeting not in the public record, there are several ways to accomplish that. First, we can setup a trust. A trust will hold your assets during your lifetime, you will manage everything virtually the same way you did before, and upon your disability or death, the trust spells out who is going to take over and who gets what and when. A trust is a great instrument for payment of money over time. So, if you have minor children, a trust could be the solution for you. Another way to avoid probate is to make sure you have beneficiary designations on all of your assets. For example, on your house or real estate, you can sign a beneficiary deed that states who gets your house or real property upon your passing, and all the person has to do to receive that property is to record a death certificate with the Maricopa County recorder’s office. With your vehicles, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows you to sign a beneficiary designation form that will allow for easy transfer of title upon your death. And, with financial accounts and life insurance, you can nominate the person or persons who will receive those assets all without ever having to go through probate. If you would like to setup an estate plan to avoid the probate process, please give us a call at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

Estate Planning lawyers listing in .
Estate Planning Articles

Using a Trust to Protect Your Assets

When you create a Trust (watch attorney, Mark Bregman, explain), you may believe you are automatically protected against loss -- and with…

Read More