Arizona Estate Planning Laws

How To Avoid Probate | Scottsdale Estate Planning

Michelle J. Perkins

 

If you are interested in avoiding probate and having your estate administered privately, meeting not in the public record, there are several ways to accomplish that. First, we can setup a trust. A trust will hold your assets during your lifetime, you will manage everything virtually the same way you did before, and upon your disability or death, the trust spells out who is going to take over and who gets what and when. A trust is a great instrument for payment of money over time. So, if you have minor children, a trust could be the solution for you. Another way to avoid probate is to make sure you have beneficiary designations on all of your assets. For example, on your house or real estate, you can sign a beneficiary deed that states who gets your house or real property upon your passing, and all the person has to do to receive that property is to record a death certificate with the Maricopa County recorder’s office. With your vehicles, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows you to sign a beneficiary designation form that will allow for easy transfer of title upon your death. And, with financial accounts and life insurance, you can nominate the person or persons who will receive those assets all without ever having to go through probate. If you would like to setup an estate plan to avoid the probate process, please give us a call at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

If you are interested in avoiding probate and having your estate administered privately, meeting not in the public record, there are several ways to accomplish that. First, we can setup a trust. A trust will hold your assets during your lifetime, you will manage everything virtually the same way you did before, and upon your disability or death, the trust spells out who is going to take over and who gets what and when. A trust is a great instrument for payment of money over time. So, if you have minor children, a trust could be the solution for you. Another way to avoid probate is to make sure you have beneficiary designations on all of your assets. For example, on your house or real estate, you can sign a beneficiary deed that states who gets your house or real property upon your passing, and all the person has to do to receive that property is to record a death certificate with the Maricopa County recorder’s office. With your vehicles, the Motor Vehicle Department now allows you to sign a beneficiary designation form that will allow for easy transfer of title upon your death. And, with financial accounts and life insurance, you can nominate the person or persons who will receive those assets all without ever having to go through probate. If you would like to setup an estate plan to avoid the probate process, please give us a call at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

What is a Trust | Scottsdale Estate Planning

Chris Hildebrand

 

Trusts

I want to speak to you today regarding what a trust is in the state of Arizona. A trust is a legal document authorizing a third party, known as a trustee, to manage your income and assets for the benefit of your beneficiaries. It may either be a revocable, meaning the trust may be terminated, or irrevocable, meaning the trust may not be terminated and the income and assets must remain in the trust and manage according to the terms of the trust.

Benefits of a Trust

A properly executed trust may be used by a person to avoid probate of the estate after his or her death and to control the manner in which his or her wealth is distributed or managed for the benefit of the beneficiaries. There are also potential tax benefits and legal protections available from the creditors of your beneficiaries that are inherent in trusts. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law if you have any other questions regarding trusts in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

Trusts

I want to speak to you today regarding what a trust is in the state of Arizona. A trust is a legal document authorizing a third party, known as a trustee, to manage your income and assets for the benefit of your beneficiaries. It may either be a revocable, meaning the trust may be terminated, or irrevocable, meaning the trust may not be terminated and the income and assets must remain in the trust and manage according to the terms of the trust.

Benefits of a Trust

A properly executed trust may be used by a person to avoid probate of the estate after his or her death and to control the manner in which his or her wealth is distributed or managed for the benefit of the beneficiaries. There are also potential tax benefits and legal protections available from the creditors of your beneficiaries that are inherent in trusts. Please feel free to contact the attorneys at Hildebrand Law if you have any other questions regarding trusts in Arizona.

By: Chris Hildebrand

What is an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

An irrevocable life insurance trust is a trust that if properly setup and maintained, will exclude the death benefit from your taxable estate, and maybe used to establish trusts for your loved ones where the assets of your trust are protected from your loved one’s creditors and there own spend thrift habits. There are many features to a life insurance trust that can add flexibility to your ability to control the assets and remain within IRS guidelines. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating a life insurance trust for you that will stand the test of time.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

An irrevocable life insurance trust is a trust that if properly setup and maintained, will exclude the death benefit from your taxable estate, and maybe used to establish trusts for your loved ones where the assets of your trust are protected from your loved one’s creditors and there own spend thrift habits. There are many features to a life insurance trust that can add flexibility to your ability to control the assets and remain within IRS guidelines. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating a life insurance trust for you that will stand the test of time.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

What are Typical Estate Planning Documents | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

Typical estate planning documents include a living trust, a pour-over will, a living will, and powers of attorney for financial, health care, and mental health care decision-making. Tax planning, if needed, may include irrevocable trusts and asset protection may include LLCs, trusts, and careful planning. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own effective and affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

Typical estate planning documents include a living trust, a pour-over will, a living will, and powers of attorney for financial, health care, and mental health care decision-making. Tax planning, if needed, may include irrevocable trusts and asset protection may include LLCs, trusts, and careful planning. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own effective and affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

What is a Living Trust | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

A living trust is a popular tool used to avoid a probate proceeding, provide creditor protection to a surviving spouse, keep your financial information private, and allow you to avoid a conservatorship and direct who will handle your finances if you are unable to do so yourself. It allows you to give your wealth to who you want, when you want, and how you want all at the lowest possible cost including taxes, expenses, and professional fees. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

A living trust is a popular tool used to avoid a probate proceeding, provide creditor protection to a surviving spouse, keep your financial information private, and allow you to avoid a conservatorship and direct who will handle your finances if you are unable to do so yourself. It allows you to give your wealth to who you want, when you want, and how you want all at the lowest possible cost including taxes, expenses, and professional fees. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out more about creating your own affordable estate plan.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

Irrevocable Trust Laws Explained | Phoenix Estate Planning

Beth Cohn

 

Hi, I’m Beth Cohn. I’m an attorney at Jaburg Wilk and I work in the area of estate planning.

What is an Irrevocable Trust

An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be changed. Many times, people will use an irrevocable trust when they want to make gifts to their children or their grandchildren and they don’t want them to get the benefits from those trusts right away.

Amending Irrevocable Trusts in Arizona

There are a couple of options under Arizona law and one of them is having to go to court. We have a new set of statutes in Arizona, under our Arizona Trust Code, that give us guidelines of when we have to go to court in order to request court approval to make changes to irrevocable trusts. But there’s also some more flexibility that’s been given to trustees to make some changes if the provisions and the trusts allow it.

Provisions That Allow Changes to be Made

There’s a provision that’s called decanting and decanting is available for certain trusts. Usually, there’s something in that trust that someone doesn’t like. And what they do, literally, is they create a new trust and they pour those assets from the old trust into the new trust. So decanting is a technique that allows a trustee to make that decision and to transfer assets from the old broken trust to a new fixed trust. There’s some other requirements that are more technical, but it gives the trustee a lot of power if the trustee has certain discretion in the trust.

Do I Need an Attorney to Make a Trust

Well, I think there’s always a benefit. Unfortunately, I’ve seen some of the worst cases when people have grabbed forms and tried to do estate plans themselves. Whether the estate is smaller or larger, estate planning is very technical and there’s rules that we have to comply with. So I advise anybody who needs to have an estate plan done, to see an attorney.

By: Beth Cohn

Hi, I’m Beth Cohn. I’m an attorney at Jaburg Wilk and I work in the area of estate planning.

What is an Irrevocable Trust

An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be changed. Many times, people will use an irrevocable trust when they want to make gifts to their children or their grandchildren and they don’t want them to get the benefits from those trusts right away.

Amending Irrevocable Trusts in Arizona

There are a couple of options under Arizona law and one of them is having to go to court. We have a new set of statutes in Arizona, under our Arizona Trust Code, that give us guidelines of when we have to go to court in order to request court approval to make changes to irrevocable trusts. But there’s also some more flexibility that’s been given to trustees to make some changes if the provisions and the trusts allow it.

Provisions That Allow Changes to be Made

There’s a provision that’s called decanting and decanting is available for certain trusts. Usually, there’s something in that trust that someone doesn’t like. And what they do, literally, is they create a new trust and they pour those assets from the old trust into the new trust. So decanting is a technique that allows a trustee to make that decision and to transfer assets from the old broken trust to a new fixed trust. There’s some other requirements that are more technical, but it gives the trustee a lot of power if the trustee has certain discretion in the trust.

Do I Need an Attorney to Make a Trust

Well, I think there’s always a benefit. Unfortunately, I’ve seen some of the worst cases when people have grabbed forms and tried to do estate plans themselves. Whether the estate is smaller or larger, estate planning is very technical and there’s rules that we have to comply with. So I advise anybody who needs to have an estate plan done, to see an attorney.

By: Beth Cohn

What is a Living Will | Arizona

Mark Bregman

 

A living will is a declaration that you do not want to be kept alive if you are in a persistent vegetative state, an irreversible coma, or have an incurable illness or progressive disease and you will die naturally unless heroic or artificial measures, such as a feeding tube, or a breathing apparatus are used. A living will can declare that if you are in a persistent vegetative state, irreversible coma, or dying from an incurable disease or illness, you want as much pain medication as you need to be kept comfortable, even if hastens the moment of your death, or exceeds routine guidelines. A living will is different than a health care power of attorney, which gives authority to your agent to make health care decisions for you if you are unable to make them yourself. Today, most clients also want a mental health care power of attorney, which declares that if you are unable to give informed consent to your placement in a facility or other recommended treatment, your agent has the authority to agree to the placement or treatment without first obtaining a court order. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out how I can use my knowledge and experience to help you and your family from suffering during an end of life experience.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

A living will is a declaration that you do not want to be kept alive if you are in a persistent vegetative state, an irreversible coma, or have an incurable illness or progressive disease and you will die naturally unless heroic or artificial measures, such as a feeding tube, or a breathing apparatus are used. A living will can declare that if you are in a persistent vegetative state, irreversible coma, or dying from an incurable disease or illness, you want as much pain medication as you need to be kept comfortable, even if hastens the moment of your death, or exceeds routine guidelines. A living will is different than a health care power of attorney, which gives authority to your agent to make health care decisions for you if you are unable to make them yourself. Today, most clients also want a mental health care power of attorney, which declares that if you are unable to give informed consent to your placement in a facility or other recommended treatment, your agent has the authority to agree to the placement or treatment without first obtaining a court order. I’m Mark Bregman. Contact me at (480) 945-9131 to find out how I can use my knowledge and experience to help you and your family from suffering during an end of life experience.

By: Attorney Mark Bregman

What is a Conservatorship in Arizona?

Michelle J. Perkins

 

In the event that a person does not create an estate plan and nominate someone to take over his or her finances, and that person later becomes unable to manage their financial affairs, the state of Arizona has setup what is called a conservatorship. A conservatorship is a legal court proceeding for the person that is going to take over your finances must file a petition with the court to apply and qualify to become your conservator. If the court approves the person to become your conservator, the court will then issue an order granting that person the legal authority to transact business on your behalf, including your financial accounts, real estate, and motor vehicles. When someone is appointed by the court as a conservator, he or she must account to the court for the money that is spent on your behalf each year. What that means is, the conservator has to prepare and file an annual accounting and submit it to the court. It is then reviewed by the court accountant and either approved, or the court accountant can ask for further clarification. And, with each annual accounting, there is a filing fee that must be paid to the court to have the court accountant review the accounting. There is a very easy way to avoid all of this. All you have to do is contact Owens & Perkins to create an estate plan before you actually need it. Included in every estate plan is a financial power of attorney, where you get to select the individual or trust company that will manage your money if you become unable. If you would like to schedule a consultation to discuss either filing for a conservatorship, or to create your own estate plan, please call us at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you are seeking a Conservatorship in Arizona, please visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

In the event that a person does not create an estate plan and nominate someone to take over his or her finances, and that person later becomes unable to manage their financial affairs, the state of Arizona has setup what is called a conservatorship. A conservatorship is a legal court proceeding for the person that is going to take over your finances must file a petition with the court to apply and qualify to become your conservator. If the court approves the person to become your conservator, the court will then issue an order granting that person the legal authority to transact business on your behalf, including your financial accounts, real estate, and motor vehicles. When someone is appointed by the court as a conservator, he or she must account to the court for the money that is spent on your behalf each year. What that means is, the conservator has to prepare and file an annual accounting and submit it to the court. It is then reviewed by the court accountant and either approved, or the court accountant can ask for further clarification. And, with each annual accounting, there is a filing fee that must be paid to the court to have the court accountant review the accounting. There is a very easy way to avoid all of this. All you have to do is contact Owens & Perkins to create an estate plan before you actually need it. Included in every estate plan is a financial power of attorney, where you get to select the individual or trust company that will manage your money if you become unable. If you would like to schedule a consultation to discuss either filing for a conservatorship, or to create your own estate plan, please call us at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

If you are seeking a Conservatorship in Arizona, please visit this profile and submit a contact form.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

What Does Estate Planning Mean | Arizona

Michelle J. Perkins

 

Estate planning is when a client comes in to work with a lawyer to create and develop a plan for the distribution of their assets upon their passing. It also includes planning for assistance from others during the persons’ lifetime as they get older. If you don’t create your own estate plan, the state of Arizona has already decided who will get your assets. At Owens & Perkins, we understand that creating an estate plan can sometimes be daunting or uncomfortable. That’s why we’ve created a system to make it as easy as 1-2-3. First, contact our office and we will send you an estate-planning questionnaire that will walk you through each decision you have to make. Second, bring your completed estate-planning questionnaire in for a consultation with one of our highly trained lawyers. We handle all of the drafting, send the documents to you for review, and all you have to do is come in to sign. It’s that easy. And, when it’s done, people say they feel so much better knowing that they have a plan in place. It brings them comfort and peace of mind. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call us at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

Estate planning is when a client comes in to work with a lawyer to create and develop a plan for the distribution of their assets upon their passing. It also includes planning for assistance from others during the persons’ lifetime as they get older. If you don’t create your own estate plan, the state of Arizona has already decided who will get your assets. At Owens & Perkins, we understand that creating an estate plan can sometimes be daunting or uncomfortable. That’s why we’ve created a system to make it as easy as 1-2-3. First, contact our office and we will send you an estate-planning questionnaire that will walk you through each decision you have to make. Second, bring your completed estate-planning questionnaire in for a consultation with one of our highly trained lawyers. We handle all of the drafting, send the documents to you for review, and all you have to do is come in to sign. It’s that easy. And, when it’s done, people say they feel so much better knowing that they have a plan in place. It brings them comfort and peace of mind. If you would like to create, revise, or update your estate plan, please call us at Owens & Perkins at (480) 994-8824.

By: Attorney Michelle Perkins

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